Doc Wong Ride Topics:
Smooth Riding - Body English and Weight Transfer



Tips from the Doc:

When you corner, there is a balance point where your body weight will seems to disappear from the bike, becoming a perfect passenger. This is what Keith Code has mentioned on numberous occasions when he lectured at the Doc Wong Riding Clinics.

My talk included a one hour discussion of how to reach this point and has been my longest discussion on a riding technique. It's the most simple technique, but the most complicated to explain. Once you get it, it is simple, however most of us are adding unnecessary motions to our cornering. The problem is being able to identify what we are doing while riding (the unnecessary motions) and making it simple...."Going with the bike".

"Sounds" simple, however, over 98% of the riders I see are making these mistakes.

Most riders error in trying to "lean" the bike to influence it's motion, this is an error as the best way to turn a bike is to reposition your body and keep it there, balancing. These riders are leaning a bit too much for the speeds they are going and thus have to counter-counter lean the bike to compensate. The symptoms of this are tight on the handle bars. The rider in mid corner is either pushing the outside bar or pulling on the inside bar to compensate. If they relaxed on the bars at that point, the bike will turn in even faster or further.

The other error is to lean your body back towards center line while your bike goes from the transition of vertical to leaned over. I even see this in numerous magazine photo shoots. You'll see a bike leaned over and the rider's head position to the outside of centerline of the wind screen. This is a telltale sign. Let's simply look at one's head position while cornering:

Incorrectly done:

While entering the turn, the rider repositions his or her body to the inside of the turn, as the bike leans over, his or her body stays is the same position - relative to earth. Another way to look at it is while leaning the bike over, the rider leans to the outside of the turn. A very very common mistake.

Correctly done:

While entering the turn, the rider repositions his or her body to the inside of the turn. As the bike leans over, his or her body stays is the same position - relative to the bike.

Sounds simple?

For more information I'd recommend Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist I and II. It's full of very workable riding topics for street and race track riding.



–Dr. Wong





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Doc Wong Ride Topics:
Smooth Riding - Body English and Weight Transfer




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